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Do you desire a role where you can contribute code to an open source project as part of your daily responsibilities? During work hours and not in your spare time? It goes without saying that a lot of developers dream of such a scenario. These opportunities exist more and more each day.

But, one must not assume they will be able to take part in such an activity based upon initial rhetoric. Instead, you must research a company to its core if you are presented with such a proposition.

Corporations love to provide “promises”. They even love it more when these “promises” are not in written form. It is easy for them to spew out grandiose plans on the ways in which they are going to utilize your talents. It is a natural way to recruit individuals, albeit, a borderline unethical one.

This is no different in the world of open source software. There have been numerous instances where I have seen a candidate that has been “promised” to be able to either continue to work on open source software work that he/she has been doing, or get involved with open source development that the company is doing. Unfortunately, that is not the way it has turned out for some individuals. Luckily, it is a strong minority, but it is still a sliver of the pie.

We have reopened the discussion about Unix to Linux migration with respect to careers of Unix and Linux professionals and its impact on organizations and the entire FOSS community. Kerry Kim, Director of Solutions Marketing for SUSE, has shared with us his insights regarding the continuing effort in migration from proprietary software.

LinuxCareer.com: How do you think the migration of Unix to Linux will affect the career of Unix professionals? In your opinion, is there a large gap between Unix and Linux skills?
Kerry Kim: It may sound counter-intuitive, but I expect the continued migration of UNIX to Linux to positively impact the careers of Linux professionals. UNIX admins are some of the smartest IT guys around. And given the architectural similarities between UNIX and Linux (e.g. both are POSIX compliant), many of the skills UNIX administrators possess are directly transferable to Linux.

With very little investment, I see UNIX admins as quickly becoming proficient on Linux, especially SUSE Linux Enterprise Server, which has a design emphasis on interoperability. Based on personal experience at UNIX user group meetings I've attended, I've seen strong interest in further exploring Linux technologies.

About LinuxCareer.com

LinuxCareer.com is an independent web portal examining a wide range of GNU/Linux and FLOSS related affairs.

We specialize in FLOSS based careers and closely related Information Technology fields. Our goal is to provide readers advice on career advancement and inform them about current employment opportunities.

We are not affiliated with any local or international company, nor are we a recruitment or employment agency.

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